Exercise or Diet Alone Isn’t Enough to Prevent Disease, Study Shows

Sprawling new research showed that healthy eating and regular workouts do not, in isolation, stave off later health issues. They need to be done together.

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Sprawling new research showed that healthy eating and regular workouts do not, in isolation, stave off later health issues. They need to be done together.

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By Dani Blum

Health food or exercise alone isn’t enough to prevent chronic disease, new research shows. Contrary to popular belief, you can’t outrun the toll of a poor diet — and healthy eating, on its own, won’t ward off disease.

Most people know that working out and eating well are critical components of overall health. But a sweeping study published this week in the British Journal of Sports Medicine suggests that hitting the gym won’t counteract the consequences of consuming fat-laden foods, and mainlining kale can’t cancel out sedentary habits.